Stuff in Your Home: Making It More Earth Friendly

How do you look at your stuff? There’s a lot of stuff that makes up your home. When you think about it, your home is a collection of a bunch of resources, materials, and systems. Or, in other words, a lot of stuff. How can you look at the stuff in your home in terms of the three R’s when you bring in more stuff?

The Three R’s and Your Stuff

It can be a fun challenge to bring more stuff in your home following the three R’s: reduce, reuse, and recycle.

Reduce
Anytime you can reduce the amount of material you use, you win. This not only simplifies your life, but also reduces the amount of materials and how much it costs to put those things together for your home. For instance, maybe instead of putting flooring down, you may just want to finish the concrete. The simpler you can make it, maybe even by using a system, that can work to your advantage.

Reuse
There are secondhand stores everywhere, so this is pretty easy. Have you checked out Habitat for Humanity’s ReStores? They have so much stuff in there, and it changes all the time. It can be an adventure to search for used furniture and household goods for building materials. You might even be able to reuse components from homes that are being torn down, remodeled, or redecorated. How about taking an old door and turning it into a table or transforming a tabletop into a barn door?

Recycle
This is probably the one R we see the most. A lot of us have curbside recycling bins, so we feel like we’re constantly feeding the system. And we’re giving those materials a new opportunity for a new life when they’re recycled. Unfortunately, we don’t have enough places demanding those recycled materials, and a lot of our recycling efforts are not coming to fruition. But you can make a difference when you put new stuff in your home that has recycled components, such as flooring and paper.

What Is the Stuff in Your Home?

You’ll get all kinds of ideas on how to get the right stuff in your home in this podcast. Be sure to check back for new information regularly on how you can make your home greener by using the three R’s plus other ideas!

Resources

Recycled Bathroom Tissue

Fab Habitat Recycled Plastic Rugs

Listen to the podcast or read the full transcript below.

The stuff our homes are made of, and the stuff that comes into our homes and the stuff that we take care of our, in our homes, a lot of stuff. This is Marla, the green home coach. And I’m going to take a little time with you today to reconsider how you look at your stuff, and all the stuff that makes up your home. Because you know, actually your home. It’s just a collection of a bunch of resources and materials and systems and all the things that make those up. And it really all constitutes stuff. But one of the things that I really found to be encouraging. And also a little bit of a fun challenge was to bring more stuff into my home that had been following the three R’s. You remember the three R’s reuse, reduce and recycle? How can you apply that to the material and the resources that make up your home? Well, let’s take each one and see if we come up with a few ideas, reuse? Well, this one’s pretty easy. There are secondhand stores everywhere. Now I find secondhand stores for furniture and household goods for building materials. Have you checked out habitat for humanity’s restore? Oh, my gosh, they have so much stuff there. And it changes all the time. So it’s constantly a great adventure, you might even be able to reuse components from homes that are being torn down or remodeled, or redecorated. There’s lots of options to find ways to reuse things that have previously been used. Or maybe they’re being used in a different way. Now, how about taking an old door and making it into a table, how about taking the top off of the table and making it into a barn door, all kinds of ideas. I know a lot of folks think there’s, there’s just so many options out there. And with a lot of the DIY stuff that’s going on right now. And I’m not a DIY or but I love watching it, you can take a piece of furniture or a piece of household item or some element of a home and reuse it in new and creative ways.

 

Second, or reduce this one makes a lot of sense to anytime you have a material and you can use less of it, the the framing the lumber that you’re using in the framing of the home down to fewer finishes in a home. This is a way to not only simplify your life, but also reduce the amount of materials and how much it costs to put those things together for your home. So for instance, maybe instead of putting flooring down, you just want to finish the concrete. Or maybe you just use fewer materials use a simpler approach, you might have a system that only requires say, two or three components instead of five or six. So the simpler you can make it and still get the desired end result. Or maybe there’s a system that allows you to use fewer resources, then that’s going to be something that’s going to work in your advantage. This is also a great place to think how you can use materials more wisely, that might last longer. So it may not reduce the need right away. But over the lifetime of that element, or the entire home, it may reduce the need for materials and replacement. The third are recycle. And this is the one that we see out there the most. And we all have not all but a lot of us have our curbside recycling bins. So we feel like we’re constantly feeding the system. And we’re giving an opportunity for those materials to take new life when they’re recycled. Although the bad news is, is that we don’t have enough places demanding those materials. And a lot of our recycling efforts are not coming to fruition. So what’s the best thing you can do buy recycled, buy stuff that has recycled content. There’s all kinds of things for your home that have recycled content from flooring, to carpet to fabrics, all kinds of options. And then of course, there’s paper and this is my favorite, the great toilet paper debate. But did you know that you can buy recycled toilet paper? And no, it’s not toilet paper. There’s been recycled paper. It’s been recycled and made into toilet paper. There’s a great blog with a lot of fun comments on our website that you might want to check out about the great toilet paper debate or better yet listening to the upcoming podcast. The stuff our homes are made of to learn more about the resource is a materials that go into your home and how you can take advantage of making the best of it.

 

 

 

Unknown  

Welcome to the Green Gab, with Marla Esser Cloos with co host,

 

Unknown  

Tony Pratte from the sound room,

 

Unknown  

and we are here gabbing about green companies, green homes and green living. And we got all kinds of things to gab about

 

Unknown  

down way.

 

Unknown  

I would think we have one or two, what’s the main topic we’re going to do today?

 

Unknown  

Hey, today’s gonna be resources. Oh, that sounds really

 

Unknown  

nice. Basically, everything that goes in house,

 

Unknown  

I know, when you and I were talking about this, there’s a lot of ways to think about resources. So we’re really going to get into this kind of some different things to think about. And this is kind of a techie section, you know, it’s not just the

 

Unknown  

materials, though, it’s the philosophy behind everything, right? You know, think about the reason we worry about resources in green building, it’s, we want to find the best ways to use our natural environment and those natural resources without worrying about possible depletion. It’s the old leave something for the next generation, right?

 

Unknown  

That it’s also making do with what you have, there’s a great quote that my grandmother always used, and I never get it right. I’m gonna have to go find it. But I’ll put it in the podcast notes. But basically, it’s use what you’ve got, right? And then when it doesn’t work anymore, you something else send you something else, I need to memorize that quote,

 

Unknown  

or at least write it down. I know finding texted to you.

 

Unknown  

And maybe on the break, I’ll be able to find it. And I’ll bring it back in part two.

 

Unknown  

Now. It’s in my notes somewhere, because it’s actually one that I had submitted for the book. So

 

Unknown  

okay. Speaking of speaking of the book.

 

Unknown  

Yeah. So you and I are getting a really cool opportunity here to work together on the book I’ve been working on with you do in the photo. Yeah,

 

Unknown  

it’s kind of nice, because I’ve been always doing photography since I was in high school, but just not as broadly as I do now. And, you know, we went out this past Saturday, we had that list from your editor of the pictures she wanted, and we just kind of went around St.

 

Unknown  

Louis taking pictures. And the cool thing was, is that we saw all kinds of resources, right? We did, and all parts of town and alternate styles of homes. And

 

Unknown  

we saw his impressive we saw structures built hundred something years ago, we saw structures built two years ago.

 

Unknown  

Yeah, and we haven’t finished I have to say, and I think you and I even talked about this when we were out. I forget how diverse this community of St. Louis is. And for any of our listeners that also live in communities where you have that kind of diversity. Take a moment and be thankful for that, because it’s astonishingly Wonderful.

 

Unknown  

Well, we’re very lucky, Ani. We live in one of the oldest towns, oldest cities in the West, and better you defined anything really west of the Mississippi as the West. Oh, yeah. So here we are. We’re establishing the 1700s French, the Spanish, you go through that whole different, you know, list of people that have lived here and all the different architectures. So we have all these structures that have been around

 

Unknown  

somebody.

 

Unknown  

Yeah, you remember, when we hosted the national green building conference in 2009? I

 

Unknown  

was just getting active in that part. Right.

 

Unknown  

So I remember being on the green building tour. And Matt Belcher had me doing when we did the actual full tour some of the historical notes of St. Louis.

 

Unknown  

I didn’t know that. Yeah, yeah.

 

Unknown  

Well, you know, I mean, oh, yeah, by I’ve got it now.

 

Unknown  

I could, yes. Well, anyway, there were people from out west. And when we mean Outlast, now, we’re talking California, Oregon, Washington State, places like that. And they had no idea did, they were just walking around parts of downtown and town and just staring at the architecture and amazement of you don’t find anything like this out there. Because you don’t find anything that’s even more than two years old.

 

Unknown  

Yeah, it’s too new. And there’s actually totally off topic here. But there’s an awesome architectural tour in downtown St. Louis, at the American Institute of Architects, thank you, that they offer a wonderful walking tour downtown, that really gives you some history and some architectural background and relevance. And the reason that architecture and resources are so important to one of each other is because a lot of times how design is done is reliant on the resources used, right. So this is the perfect segue actually, and we didn’t even plan it, how’s that

 

Unknown  

the architects can sit there, and specs, certain materials, especially if they know you’re trying to do different sustainable designs.

 

Unknown  

And it can start as simply as choosing the way you build in your plans, and your design to fit the size of the materials that you’re going to use. So you’re optimizing the use of it. And that right, there is a really basic premise of resources. So think if you’re mimicking the analogy, if you’re making your own clothes, and you only had a square yard of fabric, right? So you would lay out your pattern to maximize the use of that fabric? That makes sense? What if you design house that way?

 

Unknown  

Well, you can design a lot of different things that way, right?

 

Unknown  

Yeah, but that’s where resource optimization can really make a difference. So play this down a little bit more. Now, let’s think in a traditional stick built, house frames, lumber. What if you think about how your lumber is used in that same way that you would lay out the pattern fabric, absolutely, you’re going to use less lumber, and have less waste. Exactly.

 

Unknown  

So this is part of the whole idea of resources. It’s not just choosing what you use, but how you use it. And this is something I think a lot of times kind of gets lost when a house is built on site without really tight plans, because the crew is pretty much on their own at what the superintendent or the manager on site is calling for them to do. So they’re making a lot of decisions on the fly. And what happens when we make decisions on the fly.

 

Unknown  

Or you either don’t use things the most efficient way, or you don’t even know they’re available, right? You’ll rush through things, yeah, you run the risk of actually using more material than you’ve ordered. Yep, that’s always a fun one, you’re just not as efficient as you could are, you make mistakes, and throw away.

 

Unknown  

So a couple of different ways to work around this. And these are all the cool thing is, is these are all green building practices, right. So you can really lay it out on your plans with all the cuts for the lumber, or you could use components that are prefabricated. So think of like roof trusses, or wall structures where things come in from a manufacturing plant ready to go in as a component as a structure, just the size of the house really matters or how many stories it is because it uses less materials to build a multi story building or house versus a wider versus a wider one. Plus, you’re not impacting and disturbing as much land, right. So the resources piece really starts with the design, how you think about how you’re going to make it and I think I really like that analogy of how it lays out with a pattern on a piece of fabric. Because for me, that’s very easy to visualize. And it always brings back to mind. My mom was a child during World War Two. And my grandmother was a really great seamstress. And since they didn’t have access to a lot of resources during World War Two, my grandmother would buy things by one of them like she’d buy or like a top right, and then she disassemble it. She take it apart, and she’d lay out that piece that she bought as a pattern right on fabric, which she could get more readily than she could ready made clothes, and then she would cut and she’d so the clothes

 

Unknown  

Oh, wow.

 

Unknown  

That’s the same way. It’s kind of reverse engineering. Right? Right. But if we thought of how we would use our resources like that, for our homes and our buildings and our structures, we might think about things really differently. And that’s where the whole conversation about resources really starts. And I just don’t think enough of us think of it that way. Oh, no, I would agree with that. That’s

 

Unknown  

really where you get into your custom builders that are really in green building because to them, this matters. This is the first

 

Unknown  

step and every I have another perspective that I’m going to bring up when we come back from our break in a few minutes. And then you can think maybe there’s another way to this, besides our custom builder or remodeler might approach it so come back after the break we’ll check it out.

 

 

Unknown  

back on the green gab. We’re we’re gabbing about resources, which sounds really boring. But actually pretty fun.

 

Unknown  

That’s actually pretty interesting.

 

Unknown  

So we were having this conversation before the break about Custom Home Builders being a great place to utilize different ways to use resources and optimize especially in the building structures. And there’s actually another perspective because production builders have. And for our audience that doesn’t know the word production builder, this would be the larger builders, many of them national Some even on the stock exchange that build homes a lot at a time. So these are the ones that you may be seeing, develop an entire subdivision, right, these are the ones that may be building in different locales across the country. So that’s what we refer to as a production builder where they build basically their manufacturing homes and on site that they’re building a lot of homes at the same time, they have crews going out they have a lot of project management whereas a custom builders typically building one to four houses at a time one to five. Yeah, that’s about that’s about oftentimes custom builders work much more closely with the client through the whole process where production builder will give you what they have. And here’s your three options. Yes, that yeah, I mean, you’re buying something that’s pretty much pre thought out for you. So you don’t have to make a lot of decisions, right? Just maybe about to look a custom, you really have the opportunity to do what it says and to get in to the mix of it, figure it out together different philosophies. Both right. Both have pros, both outcomes they both have a place in the market Yeah, it’s just where they fit so a lot of people have thought that the whole concept of green sustainable high performance building applies more to custom home builders because they there’s more control and more teamwork with the homeowner as you’re going through the process and that can be an awesome solution right I would agree you and I both work a lot with custom home builders however we’re seeing a lot of production builders adopt ways to streamline their business and their costs one of the ways for them to do that is to quote unquote manufacturer components of the house off of the building site so for instance they may be doing roof trusses where things come in preassembled that’s when you see the big crane putting in the trust you know, in

 

Unknown  

St. Louis I don’t think anybody builds trust as I don’t think so. Here I think they all come in pre built

 

Unknown  

now when I go to Oklahoma City my other home all roof really built on site that’s amazing they do the high front Chateaux looking room and they use a lot of lumber. And they hold a lot of hate.

 

Unknown  

Yeah, here. I mean, you’ll find every type of roof there is a dress for the most part, it’s all manufactured trust. And we have excellent facilities here to build them.

 

Unknown  

Right. And that really helps. So if you are in a locale, where you don’t have a good component builder, a good modular for modular walls or roof trusses or fortresses. If you don’t have a good manufacturer of those components in the locale, that may dictate what’s happening. Sure, especially in smaller towns or cities, you know, there’s just not as many resources available. But what production builders do have the opportunity to do is bring in these pre quote unquote, manufactured components, and then assemble them on site where they can save money and time and move faster on the process. What’s kind of ironic to some people is that that in and of itself is a green practice,

 

Unknown  

right. And there are some projects that I do know production builders will do that. But for the vast majority of them, those projects are typically multifamily condo buildings, things like that. But the vast majority of the builders will not do that. Because St. Louis is a unique town. St. Louis Yes. But there’s other parts of the country that are embracing this much more. Right. But the problem here is the union ization of the carpenters.

 

Unknown  

That’s a huge factor is in production. Yeah. And we are Union town, you’re right.

 

Unknown  

Now, granted, we are going through a labor shortage right now and worse. So this is a great way. So as we find fewer and fewer available carpenters, it might be better to go that route if the manpower is not there, to actually build the house.

 

Unknown  

So this could also mean full modular housing, where it’s, you know, almost looks like I’m not mad modular housing, manufactured housing, where it’s built in a plant and then brought on site. So things like that works in parts, right? Not not like a mobile home. So things like that might become more popular as we figure out other ways. And things like sips or panel wall systems could actually become more user friendly, and more used as we figure out ways to get around the labor shortage. Well,

 

Unknown  

now they could now there are being used in more of the custom sites, because you’re dealing with a builder that’s building one house or two house or three houses a year, they’re using them to great success. But where the problem becomes when you get into the unions is you’re not going to take the builder right now. That’s building seven our homes a year, right. He’s employed a lot of carpenters, they’re going to look at it as I’m going to have here carpet is working to put the pieces together versus actually framing the house from scratch.

 

Unknown  

So what’s coming up here is that not only is green and high performance construction, influenced by materials and planning, it’s also somewhat influenced by social issues. Yes. And socio economic issue? Yes. So this impacts a lot more areas. So most people think yes, which is why we suggest people look at this whole idea of green and sustainability through human eyes as well as through materials and process. It’s a whole list of process. Yeah, that is such a great point politics, socio economic, it plays a part in everything done. Yeah,

 

Unknown  

it does. Now granted, 20 years, if all of a sudden your workforces cut in half, what’s going to happen, the price of labor goes up right act because of the demand. Well, this is a great way to help bring down those costs.

 

Unknown  

Well, and the National Association of homebuilders and all the homebuilders Association and the trade organizations are looking for folks to join the trades, big time and professional women and building in many parts of the country is working with our student chapters and with trade schools to help get the word out that the trades are an excellent way to earn a living.

 

Unknown  

Well, not only that, you know, we talked about the middle class that was built from the manufacturing class since the manufacturing class really has gone in reality, the only thing we manufacture his house in this country that really cannot be outsourced is housing.

 

Unknown  

And we’ve hung on to that there’s a national organization. Okay, so not exactly on the topic of resources, per se, from a green perspective, but really important to understand the issues and all the things that affect this so that we as human beings can understand that our decisions really matter. Oh, absolutely. Hmm. Very interesting. So let’s jump back on resources a little bit because we’ve been talking about optimizing resources. But another way to think about optimizing resources is making them last. So choosing things that are durable and choosing processes and ways to treat those materials that are durable. So keeping moisture out to huge one because water does more damage to buildings than anything else.

 

Unknown  

Oh, absolutely. Mold issues. Water Damage, it’s the old back to Building Science in the envelope, right arrow is going to move wet to dry, right? And then

 

Unknown  

hot to collapsible, so simple. So moisture and water management with your materials. So your resources is really key and past keeping pests out. Because like termites, termites destroy it or mites are horrible. So again, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure

 

Unknown  

something as simple as you know, you’ve got your lumber shipment you’re not really going to start for a couple days. Hey, it might rain let’s put a tarp on it. Yeah, instead of the water just sitting there soaking into the wood the tarp protects the wood your house goes up it’s a dryer house it’s a cleaner house

 

Unknown  

so here’s the crazy part is that just pretty much as common sense you know, not wasting what you already have. But everybody thinks that resources and materials has to be something fancy or sustainable or you know let’s This is a whole bamboo discussion and sometimes it’s just such a simple conversation just be smart about what you’re doing well not only that, but you have to look at the big picture

 

Unknown  

every part of the puzzle yeah you know just because the thought of hey let’s use bamboo it’s renewable great except it’s grown in China and that conversation has really quieted down because it was just silly it’s a lot better to use local stuff anytime and locals a big part of resources to so us what’s around we gotta take a break be back in a sec

 

Unknown  

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Unknown  

Hey, Tony and I are getting in on the gab. The why green matters to you, your family and friends and your community. And man does resources tying into all of that?

 

Unknown  

Well, really does. It’s everything that goes into the house, whether it’s labor, whether its capital, whether it’s materials, yeah, it all matters.

 

Unknown  

It really does. And, you know, neither of us really kind of anticipated when we started this conversation about how much influences our choice of resources and how they’re used we’ve dug in, yeah, and I hope we’ve given our listeners some things to think about that. Maybe they didn’t. And that’s really my goal. And I know you and I talked about this a lot that we can just get people to ask some questions they haven’t asked before, then we feel like we’re doing the world a little good.

 

Unknown  

This is the topic where when you joke about, you know, choices matter. Yeah, this is true. You know, when we say choices matter. We’re not just joking around? No. Is it truly serious here?

 

Unknown  

Yeah, I agree. And, you know, so many of the resources that go into a house go into the structure, and the structure is the one that has to last. And when you build a building and our green building certification program, it is built with the minimum lifespan of 50 years. That’s the intent. Yeah, so think of Europe where things stand for hundreds of years

 

Unknown  

or more. NET?

 

Unknown  

Yeah, some thousands. And in the United States, we just aren’t old enough to have many of those structures, although you and I found some of the older ones here in St. Louis. But a key to things lasting a long time. And the way of structures is that resources and materials are chosen wisely. And that the regionally appropriate, right my daughter tells the story about some of the builders coming into New Orleans when she studied for her masters of architecture down there. But she would talk about when they came in from other parts of the country to build a New Orleans, they would not choose the right kind of wood, right, because it doesn’t last. So they had to replace it all with locally appropriate would because of the moisture issues in New Orleans.

 

Unknown  

It’s used to the climate. Yep. Country, basically, what all the time,

 

Unknown  

right, so those choices matter what else matters where you can, and where it makes sense. And I cannot stress how much it has to be where it makes sense. You don’t want to just start throwing these things in there, because they have to work the here’s your opportunity to reuse and salvage parts of the building components of the building. So maybe you save I have a builder client out in Washington state that deconstructed an apple shed. Oh, and then use the corrugated metal roof on one of his clients projects on their home.

 

Unknown  

Oh, interesting.

 

Unknown  

And it’s beautiful. And then they reply and beams big huge, like eight inch beams. There’s a market for taking apart old barns. And using a newer story. Yes. So this is a case of salvation and reusing those pieces. So that’s a big part. And some of the people I’ve talked to just love the history that’s in there. So not only are you saving something, and we’re using it, you’re also putting a story in your house.

 

Unknown  

You know, it’s not even just for parts of the home, the actual building structure, yes, they’ll use a lot of it for furniture, tables, dining room tables, contract labels, things like that.

 

Unknown  

So back to the three R’s, right. Don’t use reduce, so don’t use as much material reuse, right, but you can. And then lastly, recycle. So on to the next one. using recycled materials in your home. We are seeing more and more major home components made with recycled materials, carpet flooring, sometimes wall coverings, fabrics, plywood cheating by with cheating cabinetry,

 

Unknown  

yeah, some of the cabinetry coming in is recycled material.

 

Unknown  

And if it’s not recycled, it may be recyclable, right. So which means it can be used in another way later. And if any of you have not studied or read the book, Cradle to Cradle, this is an excellent study and talk about how everything in nature, there is no waste in nature, right? Every output in nature is input for another process. And the Cradle to Cradle certification process is based on that. So anything that is Cradle to Cradle certified has a complete lifecycle. It’s never waste product. And there are products that are starting to be certified actually not starting to happen for the last few years certified under this Cradle to Cradle certification, which says not only are they made from recycled, but they are recyclable or reusable in some form, so that they never generate waste.

 

Unknown  

Well, once again, as these building practices go from being more niche, or Yeah, out on the fringe, through the code processes. And then through education. And just this is all we know, this is going to become where everything has that kind of a certification to it.

 

Unknown  

And that’s the kinds of certifications and any third party independent certification is going to hold a lot more weight than a self certification for any because there’s no guesswork, right. But Cradle to Cradle is one of the more robust certifications I’m aware of. And we’re starting to see businesses understand the financial impacts of adopting these kinds of practices, because where they may spend more money, say on a material, they may spend less money on cleanup. And so there’s a whole ton of things to think about from a business model perspective that play into that, but I highly recommend William McDonough wrote the book cradle, highly recommend reading it if you haven’t yet. And it’s just a great way to understand how we can mimic nature and how we do with our resources and materials and what we may Yeah, it’s a really cool book. And sometimes, you know, we all think that renewable materials like we were saying about bamboo is the answer, and it definitely is an answer.

 

Unknown  

It has to make sense. So for instance, using bamboo on the west coast, where it’s easy to get it in from Asia probably makes a little more sense. But even then, it may not, it may not because you still gotta throw it on a ship and ship it across the Pacific Ocean, right? Whereas if you’re in the middle of country, or you’re in the East Coast, it really makes no sense.

 

Unknown  

So here in Missouri, we have lots and lots of wood, particularly maple and oak  maple. We have Oakley of Cottonwood, you have some hair curry. So it is very common in Missouri to find a local hardwood floor. Right? Well, that’s for Missouri, much more sustainable about granite

 

Unknown  

got a lot of granite here.

 

Unknown  

Okay, granted, it’s going to get me on a big discussion because the way granted his mind is not very forgiving in my mind to other materials that are mined in different ways. I’m not a big fan of granite because of that because it really is damaging to the earth when we want again

 

Unknown  

that

 

Unknown  

Yeah, you’re looking at a trade off

 

Unknown  

right so you might have to choose between a material that is not mine so well but is available locally and this is where you knowing your priorities and what’s most important to your values also helps as well as having the education about how things really come to market

 

Unknown  

because it’s all an offset isn’t solid offset. Yeah

 

Unknown  

so that regionality matters, the more you can use things that are made within a few hundred miles of your location really matters. It matters to promote recycling as a behavioral practice in what we build. And part of the way we do that is by walking our talk. And walking our talk makes using things that are made of recycled materials, using things that can be recycled, using things that people can understand where they come from. Another thing I love to see is where people are understanding what goes into their home, what are the materials and I don’t expect the average homeowner to go in and look at a whole list. Oh, here’s all the little components and screws and wood and everything else that goes in my home. But we as an industry as a whole ministry, I don’t feel personally do a great job of sharing with our homeowners in our home buyers what goes into their homes

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now, we really don’t. And in reality, when you think about it, just about all would on job site nowadays comes from some kind of a forestry managed program. It’s all sustainable is it doesn’t brag about now. And so part of our job with this podcast show Matter of fact, is to share these ideas with the public so that y’all can ask the questions and you can understand the people that are working to take a corporate or business or personal responsibility for their actions and what they do and I don’t believe we’re out of time but we so totally are again thank you for gabbing with this. Check out more on green home coach calm and have an awesome day.

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